Meet the Rescued Elephants

Wild Horizons has had an unwavering belief that the elephants welfare takes precedence. Whether is is during a rescue, the rehabilitation or release, it is all about the elephants’ future.

The Wild Horizons Elephant Sanctuary

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Your support will go directly to the efforts of continuing the elephants care, anti-poaching efforts and educating the next generation to conserve Africa’s most gentle giants.

Jake

Jake is an early sleeper and riser, and is known to be up before anyone else! Despite his size, Jake is fairly timid and dislikes water. He won’t bathe – Jake only wets behind his ears and will put some mud on his head.

In 2003 Jake was very ill with a liver problem and needed many injections – these were administered in the veins in his lower back legs – ever since then he has not liked people going behind him.

We eventually had to change, giving him the medication in pill form – this entailed 300 tablets in the morning and the evening, which we would hide in oranges to give to him. He recovered and gained back his weight – we are delighted to have him healthy again!

Coco

Coco has lived an adventurous yet tumultuous life. This sweet soul is believed to be born in 1977. She was an orphan at the age of 7-8 years, as a result of Zambezi Valley elephant culling in the mid-1980’s and was taken to a farm outside Karoi in Mashonaland West. From there, she and another elephant (Jack who is since deceased) were then taken to Chiredzi via Harare.

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Through her relocations she finally arrived at The Wild Horizons Elephant Camp in January 2006 and was immediately introduced to what is now Jake’s herd. Janet, another female didn’t like Coco moving into this herd so after some conflict, Coco was then integrated into Tendai’s herd where she is today.

Coco is a complicated lady. She is shy but as the largest and oldest, she is quite clever and can be a bit of a rebel. She has strong motherly instincts despite never having her own calf. She helped to take care of Lulu when Lulu’s mother passed away and she has also been very protective of newly orphaned arrivals that have come to the Sanctuary. She does not like loud noises or sudden movement and that could be from her rocky start in life. She is said to be ambidextrous as she uses both of her tusks almost equally. She can be a loner but will join the others out of necessity. She happily beats to her own drum and likes to feed and meander on herself.

Up until recently, Coco used to walk at the back of line likely to create a lengthy barrier between her and Janet. These days she leads the Tendai herd and seems to enjoy her new role. Although she has been moved around a lot in her lifetime, trying to find the best place to settle, it seems Coco is now very content with her herd and her life here at the Sanctuary.

Naledi

Naledi means shining star in Setswana or Sotho. She was born on the 23rd of September 2009.

She is Emily’s second calf and Izibulo’s sister. Her father is Jock. She is tuskless and is a slow- learner a trait we think she inherited from her mother. We think this might be in part because she is not a big eater and so the pellets we use as a reward are less of a motivating factor for her.

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She is always with her mother and avoids Pfumo and Izibulo who gang up and bully her in typical big brother behavior! She gets on well with Ntombi but as their parents do not get along the two do not see as much of each other as they might like.

She is quite happy to follow what her mom does and is a submissive elephant who doesn’t need a lot of disciplining from her mom. Many tusk-less elephants are aggressive over food as they are unable to strip bark or dig up roots but Naledi is yet to show any sign of this. She may still be benefiting from feeding close to her mom.

Emily

Emily was covered by a wild elephant that followed her for two weeks and then took her out ‘on a date’. This led to the birth of Izibulo (meaning “firstborn”). Izibulo didn’t suckle for the first 11 hours after his birth, as new mom Emily didn’t know to move her leg forward to expose her teat.
We were all in such a state – we ran around looking for a breast pump. We eventually found one and managed to extract milk to feed Izibulo.

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Emily has a very interesting history as she is a mother of two youngsters also at the sanctuary. Her first born is Izibulo who is now 14 years. The name means “first born” but the father of Izibulo is a wild bull. While out meandering in the bush she was followed around by a wild bull for a couple of weeks who then broke into her stable and took her out for a “date”. Emily has since had her second child, a girl named Naledi who was born in 2008.

The only other female that Emily accepts is Janet who she arrived with to the Sanctuary. They have been known to care for each others young. Emily is relaxed and is usually the last to follow her herd while out grazing. She is a slow feeder though so sometimes she has to be convinced to eat more to keep up her weight.

She is a left-handed elephant and her right tusk is especially long although she is recognizable due to her blunt tusks. . Emily is a sweet lady and is very easy going around the keepers and her herd and the keepers love her very much.

Izibulo

Emily was covered by a wild elephant that followed her for two weeks and then took her out ‘on a date’. This led to the birth of Izibulo (meaning “firstborn”). Izibulo didn’t suckle for the first 11 hours after his birth, as new mom Emily didn’t know to move her leg forward to expose her teat.
We were all in such a state – we ran around looking for a breast pump.

We eventually found one and managed to extract milk to feed Izibulo. Of course, as soon as we did this Emily stretched her leg forward, exposing her nipple and Izibulo started suckling! Izibulo is a very intelligent elephant.
He also loves people and accepts all the keepers with no problem. Even Janet, who hasn’t liked any babies or orphans, accepts him.

Jake

Jake is an early sleeper and riser, and is known to be up before anyone else! Despite his size, Jake is fairly timid and dislikes water. He won’t bathe – Jake only wets behind his ears and will put some mud on his head.

In 2003 Jake was very ill with a liver problem and needed many injections – these were administered in the veins in his lower back legs – ever since then he has not liked people going behind him.

We eventually had to change, giving him the medication in pill form – this entailed 300 tablets in the morning and the evening, which we would hide in oranges to give to him. He recovered and gained back his weight – we are delighted to have him healthy again!

Rescued elephant Janet

Janet

Jake, Emily, Janet, Michael and Damiano came from the Zambezi valley cull. They were moved from Dombowire Game Park, Bindura to Braeside on November 24, 1998. A year later, Damiano, Jake and Michael came to The Elephant Camp on July 24, 1999.

In 2000 Emily and Janet followed the boys to The Elephant Camp. Janet is very intelligent but also quite skittish.

Janet doesn’t like anything small running around her or any quick movements. Janet also doesn’t like having other females in her herd, and only accepts Emily.

We eventually had to change, giving him the medication in pill form – this entailed 300 tablets in the morning and the evening, which we would hide in oranges to give to him. He recovered and gained back his weight – we are delighted to have him healthy again!

Jock

Jock

Jock originated from Mana Pools, Zambezi and was orphaned as a result of the 1988 Zambezi Valley cull. Jock has splayed tusks and dimples in his forehead.

He is smart and gentle and known for being laid back, cautious and slow moving. Jock eats A LOT and is nicknamed “Piggy”.

Jock hardly sleeps, but rather dozes on his feet, leaning against a tree in a paddock. Jock has a narrow trunk tip and likes to use his trunk as a ‘hoover’ to suck pellets up into his trunk so that he can take more at once because of this. In 1999 Jock fell through a warthog burrow that collapsed under his weight; now he is still very scared of any holes or piles of sand due to the fright he got!

Rescued elephant Jumbo

Jumbo

‘Uncle’ Jumbo (Born 1983). Jumbo has distinctive twisted and uneven tusks and always appears healthy and fat. Jumbo is known as an especially intelligent elephant by his keepers. He loves to scratch his back on foliage.

Jumbo is the tallest of all of the elephants – his large size comes a large appetite. Jumbo is known to steal food from those around him, and if you are eating near him, you’d better watch your food! He also loves his sleep and is an early sleeper and late riser – we often find him still sleeping when everyone else is up and about!

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